Spread your magic around....
This Universe is a shapeable Universe, it responds to our thoughts, imaginations and emotion. We, 'the subject,' are a powerful creative center, the mental energy that emanets from our thoughts and emotions creates the physical reality that we desire. We are the creator of our own reality..

We are the self expression of our subconscious mind. We are a cluster of energy, so is everything else. The energy cluster that is constantly in motion, moving and changing to form new configuration and intelligently maintaining its form. This is the consciosness that keeps the energy in that particular form.

Consciousness is the mind, the mind is reality, this mind is the creator. This Universe is the collective consciousness of its people. By learning how to guide and focus our thought patterns we all can become an effective co-creator and live successfully with the matter and events of our outer physical world. We all participate in creating the exterior world that we live and this is essential for our growth. The better our abilities at creating reality, the better we are at solving problems, creating abundance and able to live in perfect harmony with this Universe. There is nothing paranormal in this Universe except our limited understanding of the Universe around us...

Psycophysics views all matters including human body as a bio-electro magnectic that vibrates in waves with specific oscillation frequencies. Electro- myograth, a devise that measures electrical activities of muscles, was discovered by Dr. Hunt. The science of Kirlian Photography is designed to detect human body's electro-magnetic field also known as human Aura. This devise is able to detect minute electrical, magnetic and optical changes in an object's environment. The color of human aura enable scientist to analyse a person's current physical, mental and emotional health.

The cosmo has certain forms of wave energy and all living things have their own unique wave energy. When this wave rythm is damaged by various factors of environment, polutions, stress and worries, the cells of our body sends out signals called disease. Human brain emitts certain electro-magnetic impulse, the brain waves alfa, beta, theta and delta waves. Human brain has two main parts the pelio cortex, which controls vital body fuctions and the neo cortex, which control thinking and cognition.

Mind and body are two parts of our being, one physical the other non physical, and they are completely dependent on each other. All illness are psychosomatic because we are not just body but mind and body.

Hippocrates (father of the modern medicine) said that everyone is a doctor within. However, our bodys ability to fuction at its optimum has been suppressed by various environmental factors, pollution, strain and stress of everyday life. We are constantly being exposed to pollutants, virus and bacteria and electromagnetic radiation. While there are inumerable new disease on the rise today, and with all these modern medical marvels, yet the answer can be found within the subconcious self. Self healing begins when mind, body and spirit regains balance with each other. Healing is a process of bringing together all parts of our being, physical, mental, emotional and spiritual self, in the symphony of life creating wholesome.

Human being has the natural abilities to heal itself. Good health is a state of mind, a state of emotional, mental, spiritual and physical balance. Human brain has the ability to manifest healing naturally. All we need to do is learn how to control our mind and unleash this ability that we were all born with. Overwhelming scientific evidence has proven it that human mind is the most potent tool in our quest for healing the body and soul.

Psychotherapy, a form of alternative practice that help eliminate traumatic experience, underlying causes of anxiety and fear from within deep subconscious. Reframing and affirmation is the methods of chanting our mind's perceptions into a perception that positively benifit the current reality. It allows one to overcome emotional blockages and hindering spirit and leads one toward the pathway of health and wellness...


Friday, December 28, 2012

Year's end is neither an end nor a beginning, its a continuing process with all the wisdom that experience can instill in us. Reflect on the time gone by, learn from  past experience,  and let  passage of time find you a better person as yet.

            Have a blessed year !!!


Microsoft Xbox 360 Kinect Sensor - 885370145106 (Google Affiliate Ad)
Samsung 16GB Galaxy Tab 2 Wi-Fi Tablet - GT-P5113TSYXAR (Google Affiliate Ad)

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

                                                        HAVE A BLESSED DAY

Friday, October 12, 2012

WATCHING THE SUN (HELIOTHERAPY) Watching the sun, the old method of healing has many health benefits. The sun can recharge every level of our energy. Let's see how. Sun is great sourse of life. Ultraviolet radiation of the Sun has positive effect on general health condition of the body, stimulates production of melanine, stimulates metabolism (especially metabolism of minerals) and generally has good impact on condition of glands with internal secretion. Thanks to the Sun, vitamin D in human organism changes into calcium, encourages the production of hormone endorphin which makes the feeling of happiness and satisfaction. This means that Sun is very good as prevention and natural cure in cases of depresion. It is generally known fact that insufficient exposure to the Sun light can cause problems with functioning of the nervous system. This is very common in Scandinavian countries which have small amount of sunny days during the year. Enough Sun light prevents from rachitis. The children who spend too many hours in the closed area: in the room or in front of the computer, take a risk to suffer from rachitis that starts because of irregular mineralisation of bones during the develpoment of the body and what is most important: in cases of lack of vitamin D. The best time for sungazing (watching the sun or heliotherapy) is in early morning and late afternoon hours (sun rise or sun set). It is good to know that exposure to the Sun in the noon, when the ultraviolet radiadion is the highest, can be very harmful and dangerous. Exposure to the sun needs to be gradual, eyes should be protected with sun glasses and head with small hat of straw or white linen. Specail caution is recommended to the persons that suffer from hyperthyroidism (increased function of thyroid gland) and hypertension (high blood pressure) because it is supersensitive when ultraviolet radiation appear. Sungazing - Sun Yoga - Solar Yoga Ancient and almost forgotten method of treating with Sun foster the teacher of sungazing Hira Ratan Manek. He is well known from 1995. because of his way of living, according to the Sun energy and water. He just sometimes drink tea, coffee or milk. This incredible interesting man lectures all around the world for several years where he points out that the core of the Sun Yoga is not in reduced need for food but in achieving balanced and healthy way of life. He developed simple and safe method of healing (watching the sun - sungazing - sun yoga), by studying solar yoga from ancient Greek times, Egyptians and native Americans. How to do Sungazing? Sungazing or watching the sun have to be conducted only once in lifetime. This process lasts for 270 days or 9-12 months, depending on number of sunny days in the month. Solar Yoga starts by looking at the Sun for 10 seconds, day-to-day. It needs to be extended for 5-10 seconds every day and at the end of the sun therapy (the last day) it lasts for 45 minutes. During watching the sun, it is recommended to stand on the ground with bare feet. What is also important: You need to look at the sun during the time so-called "golden hour". This is the name for the first hour after sunrise and the last hour when sun sets. Since the Solar Yoga needs to be conducted only once in the day and "golden hour" happens twice, no matter when you pick to exercise Solar Yoga.

Polk Audio Blackstone TL Series 5.1 Channel Home Theater Speaker System - TL1600 (Google Affiliate Ad)

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Thursday, October 4, 2012

TURMERIC      A truly wonderful herb.

The use of turmeric was described in tradition Chinese and Indian medicine as early as seventh century AD. Traditionally Turmeric has been used to treat long list of conditions, including diarrhea, fever, bronchitis,colds, parasites, worms, leprosy, bladder and kidney inflammations etc. Herbalist have applied turmeric to bruise, leech bites,festering eye infections, mouth inflammation, skin conditions and infected wounds beside its application in the cosmetic industries. Turmeric is an important seasoning ingredient many Indian cusines.
Curcumin, an active ingredient in turmeric, is an antioxidant. Antioxidants are compounds that can protect the body’s cells from damage caused by activated oxygen molecules known as free radicals. Laboratory studies have also shown that curcumin interferes with several important molecular pathways involved in cancer development, growth, and spread.
Recently, curcumin has received a great deal more attention in studies than turmeric as a whole herb. Researchers are studying curcumin to learn whether it is an effective anti-inflammatory agent and whether it holds any promise for cancer prevention or treatment. A number of studies of curcumin have shown promising results. Curcumin can kill cancer cells in laboratory dishes and also reduces growth of surviving cells. Curcumin also has been found to reduce development of several forms of cancer in laboratory animals.
Human studies of curcumin in cancer prevention and treatment are in the very early stages. One study of 15 patients with colorectal cancer was done to find out how much curcumin they could safely take, and whether they could take a dose large enough to be detected in the blood. The patients were able to take 3.6 grams of curcumin without noting ill effects. At this high dose, some curcumin and its products were found in the blood. Lower doses may work for the stomach and intestine. Even though it does not absorb well into the body, it has been shown to absorb into the colon lining and into any cancerous tissue in the colon. The researchers recommended that the high dose be used when curcumin is tested for effects outside the intestine. Other small studies have found people were able to take up to 10 grams per day for a period of a few weeks without any noticiable problems. Some researchers are currently working on ways to increase absorption of curcumin by combining it with other substances. Further clinical trials are needed to find out what role, if any, turmeric and curcumin may play in the prevention or treatment of cancer.
Here are 20 reasons to add turmeric to your diet:
1. It is a natural antiseptic and antibacterial agent, useful in disinfecting cuts and burns.
2. When combined with cauliflower, it has shown to prevent prostate cancer and stop the growth of existing prostate cancer.
3. Prevented breast cancer from spreading to the lungs in mice.
4. May prevent melanoma and cause existing melanoma cells to commit suicide.
5. Reduces the risk of childhood leukemia.
6. Is a natural liver detoxifier.
7. May prevent and slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease by removing amyloyd plaque buildup in the brain.
8. May prevent metastases from occurring in many different forms of cancer.
9. It is a potent natural anti-inflammatory that works as well as many anti-inflammatory drugs but without the side effects.
10. Has shown promise in slowing the progression of multiple sclerosis in mice.
11. Is a natural painkiller and cox-2 inhibitor.
12. May aid in fat metabolism and help in weight management.
13. Has long been used in Chinese medicine as a treatment for depression.
14. Because of its anti-inflammatory properties, it is a natural treatment for arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.
15. Boosts the effects of chemo drug paclitaxel and reduces its side effects.
16. Promising studies are underway on the effects of turmeric on pancreatic cancer.
17. Studies are ongoing in the positive effects of turmeric on multiple myeloma.
18. Has been shown to stop the growth of new blood vessels in tumors.
19. Speeds up wound healing and assists in remodeling of damaged skin.
20. May help in the treatment of psoriasis and other inflammatory skin conditions.
Turmeric can be taken in powder or pill form. It is available in pill form in most health food stores, usually in 250-500mg capsules.
Once you start using turmeric on a regular basis, it's fun to find new ways to use it in recipes. 

Contraindications: Turmeric should not be used by people with gallstones or bile obstruction. Though turmeric is often used by pregnant women, it is important to consult with a doctor before doing so as turmeric can be a uterine stimulant.

NIKE Reax Rocket Women's Running Shoes, White/Desert Pink/Blue - 9.0 (Google Affiliate Ad)

Saturday, September 29, 2012

Cinnamon is one of the oldest spices known. It was mentioned in the Bible and was used in ancient Egypt not only as a beverage flavoring and medicine, but also as an embalming agent. It was so highly treasured that it was considered more precious than gold. Around this time, cinnamon also received much attention in China, which is reflected in its mention in one of the earliest books on Chinese botanical medicine, dated around 2,700 B.C.
Cinnamon's popularity continued throughout history. It became one of the most relied upon spices in Medieval Europe. Due to its demand, cinnamon became one of the first commodities traded regularly between the Near East and Europe. Ceylon cinnamon is produced in Sri Lanka, India, Madagascar, Brazil and the Caribbean, while cassia is mainly produced in China, Vietnam and Indonesia.

Cinnamon, groundCinnamon, ground
Although available throughout the year, the fragrant, sweet and warm taste of cinnamon is a perfect spice to use during the winter months.
Cinnamon has a long history both as a spice and as a medicine. It is the brown bark of the cinnamon tree, which is available in its dried tubular form known as a quill or as ground powder. The two varieties of cinnamon, Chinese and Ceylon, have similar flavor, however the cinnamon from Ceylon is slightly sweeter, more refined and more difficult to find in local markets. 
Nutrients in
2.00 tsp (5.20 grams)
Nutrient%Daily Value




Calories (12)0%

This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Cinnamon, ground provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System. Additional information about the amount of these nutrients provided by Cinnamon, ground can be found in the Food Rating System Chart. A link that takes you to the In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Cinnamon, ground, featuring information over 80 nutrients, can be found under the Food Rating System Chart.
Cinnamon's unique healing abilities come from three basic types of components in the essential oils found in its bark. These oils contain active components called cinnamaldehyde,cinnamyl acetate, and cinnamyl alcohol, plus a wide range of other volatile substances.
Anti-Clotting Actions
Cinnamaldehyde (also called cinnamic aldehyde) has been well-researched for its effects on blood platelets. Platelets are constituents of blood that are meant to clump together under emergency circumstances (like physical injury) as a way to stop bleeding, but under normal circumstances, they can make blood flow inadequate if they clump together too much. The cinnaldehyde in cinnamon helps prevent unwanted clumping of blood platelets. (The way it accomplishes this health-protective act is by inhibiting the release of an inflammatory fatty acid called arachidonic acid from platelet membranes and reducing the formation of an inflammatory messaging molecule called thromboxane A2.) Cinnamon's ability to lower the release of arachidonic acid from cell membranes also puts it in the category of an "anti-inflammatory" food that can be helpful in lessening inflammation.
Anti-Microbial Activity
Cinnamon's essential oils also qualify it as an "anti-microbial" food, and cinnamon has been studied for its ability to help stop the growth of bacteria as well as fungi, including the commonly problematic yeast Candida. In laboratory tests, growth of yeasts that were resistant to the commonly used anti-fungal medication fluconazole was often (though not always) stopped by cinnamon extracts.
Cinnamon's antimicrobial properties are so effective that recent research demonstrates this spice can be used as an alternative to traditional food preservatives. In a study, published in the August 2003 issue of the International Journal of Food Microbiology, the addition of just a few drops of cinnamon essential oil to 100 ml (approximately 3 ounces) of carrot broth, which was then refrigerated, inhibited the growth of the foodborne pathogenic Bacillus cereus for at least 60 days. When the broth was refrigerated without the addition of cinnamon oil, the pathogenic B. cereus flourished despite the cold temperature. In addition, researchers noted that the addition of cinnamon not only acted as an effective preservative but improved the flavor of the broth.
Blood Sugar Control
Seasoning a high carb food with cinnamon can help lessen its impact on your blood sugar levels. Cinnamon slows the rate at which the stomach empties after meals, reducing the rise in blood sugar after eating. Researchers measured how quickly the stomach emptied after 14 healthy subjects ate 300 grams (1.2 cups) of rice pudding alone or seasoned with 6 grams (1.2 teaspoons) of cinnamon. Adding cinnamon to the rice pudding lowered the gastric emptying rate from 37% to 34.5% and significantly lessened the rise in blood sugar levels after eating. Am J Clin Nutr. 2 007 Jun;85(6):1552-6.
Cinnamon may also significantly help people with type 2 diabetes improve their ability to respond to insulin, thus normalizing their blood sugar levels. Both test tube and animal studies have shown that compounds in cinnamon not only stimulate insulin receptors, but also inhibit an enzyme that inactivates them, thus significantly increasing cells' ability to use glucose. Studies to confirm cinnamon's beneficial actions in humans are currently underway with the most recent report coming from researchers from the US Agricultural Research Service, who have shown that less than half a teaspoon per day of cinnamon reduces blood sugar levels in persons with type 2 diabetes. Their study included 60 Pakistani volunteers with type 2 diabetes who were not taking insulin. Subjects were divided into six groups. For 40 days, groups 1, 2 and 3 were given 1, 3, or 6 grams per day of cinnamon while groups 4, 5 and 6 received placebo capsules. Even the lowest amount of cinnamon, 1 gram per day (approximately 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon), produced an approximately 20% drop in blood sugar; cholesterol and triglycerides were lowered as well. When daily cinnamon was stopped, blood sugar levels began to increase.
Test tube, animal and human studies have all recently investigated cinnamon's ability to improve insulin activity, and thus our cells' ability to absorb and use glucose from the blood.
On going in vitro or test tube research conducted by Richard Anderson and his colleagues at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center is providing new understanding of the mechanisms through which cinnamon enhances insulin activity. In their latest paper, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Anderson et al. characterize the insulin-enhancing complexes in cinnamon—a collection of catechin/epicatechin oligomers that increase the body's insulin-dependent ability to use glucose roughly 20-fold. Some scientists had been concerned about potentially toxic effects of regularly consuming cinnamon. This new research shows that the potentially toxic compounds in cinnamon bark are found primarily in the lipid (fat) soluble fractions and are present only at very low levels in water soluble cinnamon extracts, which are the ones with the insulin-enhancing compounds.
A recent animal study demonstrating cinnamon's beneficial effects on insulin activity appeared in the December 2003 issue of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. In this study, when rats were given a daily dose of cinnamon (300 mg per kilogram of body weight) for a 3 week period, their skeletal muscle was able to absorb 17% more blood sugar per minute compared to that of control rats, which had not received cinnamon, an increase researchers attributed to cinnamon's enhancement of the muscle cells' insulin-signaling pathway.
In humans with type 2 diabetes, consuming as little as 1 gram of cinnamon per day was found to reduce blood sugar, triglycerides, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and total cholesterol, in a study published in the December 2003 issue of Diabetes Care. The placebo-controlled study evaluated 60 people with type 2 diabetes (30 men and 30 women ranging in age from 44 to 58 years) who were divided into 6 groups. Groups 1, 2, and 3 were given 1, 3, or 6 grams of cinnamon daily, while groups 4, 5, and 6 received 1, 3 or 6 grams of placebo. After 40 days, all three levels of cinnamon reduced blood sugar levels by 18-29%, triglycerides 23-30%, LDL cholesterol 7-27%, and total cholesterol 12-26%, while no significant changes were seen in those groups receiving placebo. The researchers' conclusion: including cinnamon in the diet of people with type 2 diabetes will reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.
By enhancing insulin signaling, cinnamon can prevent insulin resistance even in animals fed a high-fructose diet! A study published in Hormone Metabolism Research showed that when rats fed a high-fructose diet were also given cinnamon extract, their ability to respond to and utilize glucose (blood sugar) was improved so much that it was the same as that of rats on a normal (control) diet.
Cinnamon is so powerful an antioxidant that, when compared to six other antioxidant spices (anise, ginger, licorice, mint, nutmeg and vanilla) and the chemical food preservatives (BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole), BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene), and propyl gallate), cinnamon prevented oxidation more effectively than all the other spices (except mint) and the chemical antioxidants.
Cinnamon's Scent Boosts Brain Function
Not only does consuming cinnamon improve the body's ability to utilize blood sugar, but just smelling the wonderful odor of this sweet spice boosts brain activity!
Research led by Dr. P. Zoladz and presented April 24, 2004, at the annual meeting of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences, in Sarasota, FL, found that chewing cinnamon flavored gum or just smelling cinnamon enhanced study participants' cognitive processing. Specifically, cinnamon improved participants' scores on tasks related to attentional processes, virtual recognition memory, working memory, and visual-motor speed while working on a computer-based program. Participants were exposed to four odorant conditions: no odor, peppermint odor, jasmine, and cinnamon, with cinnamon emerging the clear winner in producing positive effects on brain function. Encouraged by the results of these studies, researchers will be evaluating cinnamon''s potential for enhancing cognition in the elderly, individuals with test-anxiety, and possibly even patients with diseases that lead to cognitive decline.
Calcium and Fiber Improve Colon Health and Protect Against Heart Disease
In addition to its unique essential oils, cinnamon is an excellent source of fiber and the trace mineral manganese while also a very good source of calcium. The combination of calcium and fiber in cinnamon is important and can be helpful for the prevention of several different conditions. Both calcium and fiber can bind to bile salts and help remove them from the body. By removing bile, fiber helps to prevent the damage that certain bile salts can cause to colon cells, thereby reducing the risk of colon cancer. In addition, when bile is removed by fiber, the body must break down cholesterol in order to make new bile. This process can help to lower high cholesterol levels, which can be helpful in preventing atherosclerosis and heart disease. For sufferers of irritable bowel syndrome, the fiber in cinnamon may also provide relief from constipation or diarrhea.
A Traditional Warming Remedy
In addition to the active components in its essential oils and its nutrient composition, cinnamon has also been valued in energy-based medical systems, such as Traditional Chinese Medicine, for its warming qualities. In these traditions, cinnamon has been used to provide relief when faced with the onset of a cold or flu, especially when mixed in a tea with some fresh ginger

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Announcing NEW bareMinerals READY® SPF 20 Foundation
What's New and Beneficial About Onions
  • The flavonoids in onion tend to be more concentrated in the outer layers of the flesh. To maximize your health benefits, peel off as little of the fleshy, edible portion as possible when removing the onion's outermost paper layer. Even a small amount of "overpeeling" can result in unwanted loss of flavonoids. For example, a red onion can lose about 20% of its quercetin and almost 75% of its anthocyanins if it is "overpeeled."
  • The total polyphenol content of onions is much higher than many people expect. (Polyphenols are one of the largest categories of phytonutrients in food. This category includes all flavonoids as well as tannins.) The total polyphenol content of onion is not only higher than its fellow allium vegetables, garlic and leeks, but also higher than tomatoes, carrots, and red bell pepper. In the French diet, only six vegetables (artichoke heart, parsley, Brussels sprouts, shallot, broccoli, and celery) have a higher polyphenol content than onion. Since the French diet has been of special interest to researchers in terms of disease prevention, onion's strong polyphenol contribution will very likely lead to follow-up studies that pay closer attention to this unique allium vegetable.
  • Within the polyphenol category, onions are also surprisingly high in flavonoids. For example, on an ounce-for-ounce basis, onions rank in the top 10 of commonly eaten vegetables in their quercetin content. The flavonoid content of onions can vary widely, depending on the exact variety and growing conditions. Although the average onion is likely to contain less than 100 milligrams of quercetin per 3-1/2 ounces, some onions do provide this amount. And while 100 milligrams may not sound like a lot, in the United States, moderate vegetable eaters average only twice this amount for all flavonoids (not just quercetin) from all vegetables per day.
  • When onions are simmered to make soup, their quercetin does not get degraded. It simply gets transferred into the water part of the soup. By using a low-heat method for preparing onion soup, you can preserve the health benefits of onion that are associated with this key flavonoid.
  • When we get quercetin by eating an onion-rather than consuming the quercetin in purified, supplement form-we may end up getting better protection from oxidative stress. That's exactly what happened in an animal study where some animals had yellow onion added to their diet in a way that would provide the same amount of quercetin provided to other animals in the form of purified quercetin extracts. The best protection came from the onion version of this flavonoid, rather than the supplement form.
  • Several servings of onion each week are sufficient to statistically lower your risk of some types of cancer. For colorectal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancer, between 1-7 servings of onion has been shown to provide risk reduction. But for decreased risk of oral and esophageal cancer, you'll need to consume one onion serving per day (approximately 1/2 cup).
WHFoods Recommendations
With their unique combination of flavonoids and sulfur-containing nutrients, the allium vegetables — such as onions — belong in your diet on a regular basis. There's research evidence for including at least one serving of an allium vegetable — such as onions — in your meal plan every day.
When onion is your allium vegetable of choice, try to consume at least one-half of a medium onion on that day, and use this guideline to adjust your recipes accordingly. For example, if you are following a recipe that yields 4 servings, include at least 2 medium onions in the recipe so that each of your 4 servings will contain at least one half medium onion.
To bring out the sweet flavor of onions we recommend using our Healthy Saute method of cooking onions for just 7 minutes. Cut onions into slices of equal 1/4-inch thickness to help them cook more evenly. The thinner you slice the onions the more quickly they will cook. Let them sit for at least 5 minutes to enhance their health-promoting properties. For more details see the Healthiest Way of Cooking Onions in the How to Enjoy section below. 
Nutrients in
1.00 cup raw (160.00 grams)
Nutrient%Daily Value

vitamin C19.7%




vitamin B69.5%




Calories (64)3%

This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Onions provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System. Additional information about the amount of these nutrients provided by Onions can be found in the Food Rating System Chart. A link that takes you to the In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Onions, featuring information over 80 nutrients, can be found under the Food Rating System Chart.
Onions, like garlic, are members of the Allium family, and both are rich in sulfur-containing compounds that are responsible for their pungent odors and for many of their health-promoting effects. A wide variety of allyl sulfides are found in onion, including the four major diallyl sulfides: DMS (diallyl monosulfide), DDS (diallyl disulfide), DTS (diallyl trisulfide), and DTTS (diallyl tetrasulfide). Also present are a wide variety of sulfoxides, including (+) S-methyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide (MCSO), (+)-S-(1-propenyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide (PRENCSO), S-methyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, S-propyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, and S-propenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide. Onions are an outstanding source of polyphenols, including the flavonoid polyphenols. Within this flavonoid category, onions are a standout source of quercetin.
Cardiovascular Benefits
Unlike the research on garlic and its cardiovascular benefits, research specifically focused on onion has mostly been conducted on animals rather than humans. In animal studies, there is evidence that onion's sulfur compounds may work in an anti-clotting capacity and help prevent the unwanted clumping together of blood platelet cells. There is also evidence showing that sulfur compounds in onion can lower blood levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, and also improve cell membrane function in red blood cells.
In human studies, most of the cardiovascular benefits have been demonstrated in the form of overall diet. Multiple studies show onion to be a food that provides protection for the heart and blood vessels when consumed in a diet that is rich in other vegetables and fruits — especially flavonoid-containing vegetables and fruits. The benefits of onion in this overall dietary context extend to prevention of heart attack. In virtually all of these diet-based studies, participants with the greatest intake of vegetables (including onions) gain the most protection. The outstanding flavonoid content of onions supports these research findings. It's also interesting to note that onion is most commonly consumed in relatively small amounts along with other foods rather than by itself. For this reason, it can be more difficult to study in large-scale dietary research studies that involve thousands of participants and rely on diet diaries to determine onion consumption.
Support for Bone and Connective Tissue
Human studies have shown that onion can help increase our bone density and may be of special benefit to women of menopausal age who are experiencing loss of bone density. In addition, there is evidence that women who have passed the age of menopause may be able to lower their risk of hip fracture through frequent consumption of onions. "Frequent" in this context means onion consumption on a daily basis! In this research on bone density in older women, very sporadic eating of onion (once a month or less) did not provide much benefit. That finding, of course, was very expected. But less expected was the finding that it took daily consumption of onion to show robust benefits for bone density. Just as in the cancer-related onion research, the take-away message here is clear: you don't want to skimp on onions when you are incorporating them into your meal plan.
In and of itself, the high sulfur content of onions may provide direct benefits to our connective tissue. Many of our connective tissue components require sulfur for their formation. For example, with the exception of hyaluronic acid, all glycosaminoglycans (GAGS) are sulfated. (GAGS are the premiere family of molecules found in the ground substance of our connective tissue.)
Anti-Inflammatory Benefits
While onion is not as well researched as garlic in terms of specific inflammatory health problems like rheumatoid arthritis or allergic airway inflammation, this allium vegetable has nevertheless been shown to provide important anti-inflammatory benefits. Onionin A — a unique sulfur molecule in onion that is found in the bulb portion of the plant — has been shown to inhibit the activity of macrophages, specialized white blood cells that play a key role in our body's immune defense system, and one of their defense activities involves the triggering of large-scale inflammatory responses. While macrophage activity is typically a good thing, inhibition of their activity can sometimes be critical in getting chronic unwanted inflammation under control.
Onion's antioxidants — including its hallmark flavonoid antioxidant, quercetin — also provide us with anti-inflammatory benefits. These antioxidants help prevent the oxidation of fatty acids in our body. When we have lower levels of oxidized fatty acids, our body produces fewer pro-inflammatory messaging molecules, and our level of inflammation is kept in check.
Cancer Protection
Onion has repeatedly been shown to lower our risk of several cancers, even when we consume it in only moderate amounts. "Moderate" generally means 1-2 times per week, even though in some studies it has been used to mean up to 5-6 times per week. Colorectal cancer, laryngeal cancer, and ovarian cancer are the cancer types for which risk is reduced along with moderate amounts of dietary onion. For other cancer types, however, moderate intake of onion has not been enough to show significant risk reduction. For these cancer types — including esophageal cancer and cancers of the mouth — daily intake of onion is required before research results show significant risk reduction.
Many factors may play a role in these different research findings for different cancer types. However, the overall take-away from this research seems clear: you do not want to err on the side of small onion servings or infrequent onion intake if you want to obtain the full cancer-related benefits of onion. A few slivers of sliced onion on a tossed salad are a good thing--but probably not enough to provide you with the cancer-related onion benefits that you are seeking. In recipes that already call for onion, try to include at least 1 whole onion (medium size) in the recipe. In recipes that do not already call for onion, consider the addition of 1 medium size onion (if you think onion might fit into the recipe and still provide a tasty outcome). In terms of individual portion sizes when you sit down to eat a meal, try to consume the equivalent of 1/2 onion.
Other Health Benefits
In animal studies, onions have shown potential for improvement of blood sugar balance, even though it is not yet clear about the carry over of these benefits for humans who are seeking better blood sugar balance from their diet. Most of the animal studies have been conducted on rats, and most have used onion juice or onion extract as the form of onion tested. Future research is needed to clarify onion's potential for helping lower blood sugar and improving blood sugar control, especially in persons with blood sugar problems.
While not as well researched as garlic in terms of antibacterial benefits, onion has nevertheless been shown to help prevent bacterial infection. Along with its sulfur-containing compounds, the flavonoid quercetin contained in onion helps provide these antibacterial benefits. We've seen studies showing antibacterial activity of onion in relationship to the bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. (These bacteria are commonly involved in the production of tooth cavities). Antibacterial benefits have also been shown in the area of gum (periodontal) disease bacteria, including Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia. Interestingly, in one study, fresh, chopped, uncooked onion had antibacterial effects on these potentially unwanted gum bacteria, but non-fresh, uncooked onion (raw onion that was chopped and then left to sit for 2 days at room temperature) did not demonstrate these same antibacterial properties nor did fresh onion that was grated and then steamed for 10 minutes. While it is not possible to draw broad conclusions from a single lab study, these findings suggest that length of storage (for onion that has been chopped but not cooked) and duration of heat exposure (in this case involving exposure to steam for 10 full minutes) can affect some of onion's health benefits. For these reasons, special care may be needed in the storage, handling, and cooking of this allium vegetable.

Sunday, April 1, 2012

For your reading pleasure...

Some say the "New Age," which was really launched by the 60s counterculture revolution, is way past its prime. Regardless, it seems that "yesterday's science fiction is today's science fact," and also that "yesterday's hallucination is today's quantum physics." The modern world has not assimilated what Einstein had to say -- never mind Niels Bohr, Edwin Schroedinger, Stephen Hawking or now, a new age voice like Deepak Chopra! Figures like Katie Byron, Marianne Williamson, Wayne Dyer, Eckhart Tolle and others, on whose shoulders the visible part of self-realization movement rests, at least in the United States, may be on a path of convergence with science. Their beliefs certainly do not oppose it.

A couple of decades ago, occultists were derided for mentioning out-of-body experiences; now scientists are producing those in a laboratory in Lausanne, Switzerland. Vortices have claimed a new legitimacy. Descartes' notion that the universe is composed of vortex fields was consigned to the category of quaint philosophical trivia; now his "relative space" is again more modern than Newton's version, and some physicists are exploring the notion that vortex motion is fundamental to matter and energy, down to the quantum level (example, work of Wiktor Lapcik). Scientists like Pete A. Sanders Jr. (author of Scientific Vortex Information, Free Soul Publishing, Sedona AZ), are helping dismiss the pseudoscientific theories of vortexes (it's "magnetism") while directing attention to the phenomenon as instrumental in the development of human consciousness of other dimensions of energy.

Thus, people who use crystals, interpret Tarot, cast the I Ching, channel the goddess, read a Fritjof Capra, could still be considered New Agers -- but it is the "old" New Age. Increasingly the vortex universe is much broader, both more involved in science and and in a view of consciousness which is not recognizable from that of 50 years ago. People like José Argüelles, whose work has certainly not been assimilated, may be on the line of transition from the old to the new New Age. The same people who are investigating vortexes, may be reading Ray Kurzweil (futurist, technologist), Mohammed Yunus (Nobel laureate, founder of micro-banking), Arundhati Roy (social commentary), Elisabeth Kübler-Ross (expert on rituals of death and dying), Abdul Aziz Said (author, professor, holds Chair of Islamic Peace at American University), or Zalman Schachter-Shalomi (Orthodox Rabbi, founder of the Jewish Renewal movement). Those aren't New Age voices at all; maybe they could be called "Third Culture" voices -- again, part of the point of convergence between scientific views with those of the "softer" arts and sciences.
window.setTimeout(function() { document.body.className = document.body.className.replace('loading', ''); }, 10);