Spread your magic around....
This Universe is a shapeable Universe, it responds to our thoughts, imaginations and emotion. We, 'the subject,' are a powerful creative center, the mental energy that emanets from our thoughts and emotions creates the physical reality that we desire. We are the creator of our own reality..

We are the self expression of our subconscious mind. We are a cluster of energy, so is everything else. The energy cluster that is constantly in motion, moving and changing to form new configuration and intelligently maintaining its form. This is the consciosness that keeps the energy in that particular form.

Consciousness is the mind, the mind is reality, this mind is the creator. This Universe is the collective consciousness of its people. By learning how to guide and focus our thought patterns we all can become an effective co-creator and live successfully with the matter and events of our outer physical world. We all participate in creating the exterior world that we live and this is essential for our growth. The better our abilities at creating reality, the better we are at solving problems, creating abundance and able to live in perfect harmony with this Universe. There is nothing paranormal in this Universe except our limited understanding of the Universe around us...

Psycophysics views all matters including human body as a bio-electro magnectic that vibrates in waves with specific oscillation frequencies. Electro- myograth, a devise that measures electrical activities of muscles, was discovered by Dr. Hunt. The science of Kirlian Photography is designed to detect human body's electro-magnetic field also known as human Aura. This devise is able to detect minute electrical, magnetic and optical changes in an object's environment. The color of human aura enable scientist to analyse a person's current physical, mental and emotional health.

The cosmo has certain forms of wave energy and all living things have their own unique wave energy. When this wave rythm is damaged by various factors of environment, polutions, stress and worries, the cells of our body sends out signals called disease. Human brain emitts certain electro-magnetic impulse, the brain waves alfa, beta, theta and delta waves. Human brain has two main parts the pelio cortex, which controls vital body fuctions and the neo cortex, which control thinking and cognition.

Mind and body are two parts of our being, one physical the other non physical, and they are completely dependent on each other. All illness are psychosomatic because we are not just body but mind and body.

Hippocrates (father of the modern medicine) said that everyone is a doctor within. However, our bodys ability to fuction at its optimum has been suppressed by various environmental factors, pollution, strain and stress of everyday life. We are constantly being exposed to pollutants, virus and bacteria and electromagnetic radiation. While there are inumerable new disease on the rise today, and with all these modern medical marvels, yet the answer can be found within the subconcious self. Self healing begins when mind, body and spirit regains balance with each other. Healing is a process of bringing together all parts of our being, physical, mental, emotional and spiritual self, in the symphony of life creating wholesome.

Human being has the natural abilities to heal itself. Good health is a state of mind, a state of emotional, mental, spiritual and physical balance. Human brain has the ability to manifest healing naturally. All we need to do is learn how to control our mind and unleash this ability that we were all born with. Overwhelming scientific evidence has proven it that human mind is the most potent tool in our quest for healing the body and soul.

Psychotherapy, a form of alternative practice that help eliminate traumatic experience, underlying causes of anxiety and fear from within deep subconscious. Reframing and affirmation is the methods of chanting our mind's perceptions into a perception that positively benifit the current reality. It allows one to overcome emotional blockages and hindering spirit and leads one toward the pathway of health and wellness...































































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Wednesday, September 19, 2012

OnionsOnions
What's New and Beneficial About Onions
  • The flavonoids in onion tend to be more concentrated in the outer layers of the flesh. To maximize your health benefits, peel off as little of the fleshy, edible portion as possible when removing the onion's outermost paper layer. Even a small amount of "overpeeling" can result in unwanted loss of flavonoids. For example, a red onion can lose about 20% of its quercetin and almost 75% of its anthocyanins if it is "overpeeled."
  • The total polyphenol content of onions is much higher than many people expect. (Polyphenols are one of the largest categories of phytonutrients in food. This category includes all flavonoids as well as tannins.) The total polyphenol content of onion is not only higher than its fellow allium vegetables, garlic and leeks, but also higher than tomatoes, carrots, and red bell pepper. In the French diet, only six vegetables (artichoke heart, parsley, Brussels sprouts, shallot, broccoli, and celery) have a higher polyphenol content than onion. Since the French diet has been of special interest to researchers in terms of disease prevention, onion's strong polyphenol contribution will very likely lead to follow-up studies that pay closer attention to this unique allium vegetable.
  • Within the polyphenol category, onions are also surprisingly high in flavonoids. For example, on an ounce-for-ounce basis, onions rank in the top 10 of commonly eaten vegetables in their quercetin content. The flavonoid content of onions can vary widely, depending on the exact variety and growing conditions. Although the average onion is likely to contain less than 100 milligrams of quercetin per 3-1/2 ounces, some onions do provide this amount. And while 100 milligrams may not sound like a lot, in the United States, moderate vegetable eaters average only twice this amount for all flavonoids (not just quercetin) from all vegetables per day.
  • When onions are simmered to make soup, their quercetin does not get degraded. It simply gets transferred into the water part of the soup. By using a low-heat method for preparing onion soup, you can preserve the health benefits of onion that are associated with this key flavonoid.
  • When we get quercetin by eating an onion-rather than consuming the quercetin in purified, supplement form-we may end up getting better protection from oxidative stress. That's exactly what happened in an animal study where some animals had yellow onion added to their diet in a way that would provide the same amount of quercetin provided to other animals in the form of purified quercetin extracts. The best protection came from the onion version of this flavonoid, rather than the supplement form.
  • Several servings of onion each week are sufficient to statistically lower your risk of some types of cancer. For colorectal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancer, between 1-7 servings of onion has been shown to provide risk reduction. But for decreased risk of oral and esophageal cancer, you'll need to consume one onion serving per day (approximately 1/2 cup).
WHFoods Recommendations
With their unique combination of flavonoids and sulfur-containing nutrients, the allium vegetables — such as onions — belong in your diet on a regular basis. There's research evidence for including at least one serving of an allium vegetable — such as onions — in your meal plan every day.
When onion is your allium vegetable of choice, try to consume at least one-half of a medium onion on that day, and use this guideline to adjust your recipes accordingly. For example, if you are following a recipe that yields 4 servings, include at least 2 medium onions in the recipe so that each of your 4 servings will contain at least one half medium onion.
To bring out the sweet flavor of onions we recommend using our Healthy Saute method of cooking onions for just 7 minutes. Cut onions into slices of equal 1/4-inch thickness to help them cook more evenly. The thinner you slice the onions the more quickly they will cook. Let them sit for at least 5 minutes to enhance their health-promoting properties. For more details see the Healthiest Way of Cooking Onions in the How to Enjoy section below. 
Nutrients in
Onions
1.00 cup raw (160.00 grams)
Nutrient%Daily Value

vitamin C19.7%

fiber10.8%

molybdenum10.6%

manganese10.5%

vitamin B69.5%

folate7.6%

potassium6.6%

tryptophan6.2%

Calories (64)3%

This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Onions provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System. Additional information about the amount of these nutrients provided by Onions can be found in the Food Rating System Chart. A link that takes you to the In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Onions, featuring information over 80 nutrients, can be found under the Food Rating System Chart.
Onions, like garlic, are members of the Allium family, and both are rich in sulfur-containing compounds that are responsible for their pungent odors and for many of their health-promoting effects. A wide variety of allyl sulfides are found in onion, including the four major diallyl sulfides: DMS (diallyl monosulfide), DDS (diallyl disulfide), DTS (diallyl trisulfide), and DTTS (diallyl tetrasulfide). Also present are a wide variety of sulfoxides, including (+) S-methyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide (MCSO), (+)-S-(1-propenyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide (PRENCSO), S-methyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, S-propyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, and S-propenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide. Onions are an outstanding source of polyphenols, including the flavonoid polyphenols. Within this flavonoid category, onions are a standout source of quercetin.
Cardiovascular Benefits
Unlike the research on garlic and its cardiovascular benefits, research specifically focused on onion has mostly been conducted on animals rather than humans. In animal studies, there is evidence that onion's sulfur compounds may work in an anti-clotting capacity and help prevent the unwanted clumping together of blood platelet cells. There is also evidence showing that sulfur compounds in onion can lower blood levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, and also improve cell membrane function in red blood cells.
In human studies, most of the cardiovascular benefits have been demonstrated in the form of overall diet. Multiple studies show onion to be a food that provides protection for the heart and blood vessels when consumed in a diet that is rich in other vegetables and fruits — especially flavonoid-containing vegetables and fruits. The benefits of onion in this overall dietary context extend to prevention of heart attack. In virtually all of these diet-based studies, participants with the greatest intake of vegetables (including onions) gain the most protection. The outstanding flavonoid content of onions supports these research findings. It's also interesting to note that onion is most commonly consumed in relatively small amounts along with other foods rather than by itself. For this reason, it can be more difficult to study in large-scale dietary research studies that involve thousands of participants and rely on diet diaries to determine onion consumption.
Support for Bone and Connective Tissue
Human studies have shown that onion can help increase our bone density and may be of special benefit to women of menopausal age who are experiencing loss of bone density. In addition, there is evidence that women who have passed the age of menopause may be able to lower their risk of hip fracture through frequent consumption of onions. "Frequent" in this context means onion consumption on a daily basis! In this research on bone density in older women, very sporadic eating of onion (once a month or less) did not provide much benefit. That finding, of course, was very expected. But less expected was the finding that it took daily consumption of onion to show robust benefits for bone density. Just as in the cancer-related onion research, the take-away message here is clear: you don't want to skimp on onions when you are incorporating them into your meal plan.
In and of itself, the high sulfur content of onions may provide direct benefits to our connective tissue. Many of our connective tissue components require sulfur for their formation. For example, with the exception of hyaluronic acid, all glycosaminoglycans (GAGS) are sulfated. (GAGS are the premiere family of molecules found in the ground substance of our connective tissue.)
Anti-Inflammatory Benefits
While onion is not as well researched as garlic in terms of specific inflammatory health problems like rheumatoid arthritis or allergic airway inflammation, this allium vegetable has nevertheless been shown to provide important anti-inflammatory benefits. Onionin A — a unique sulfur molecule in onion that is found in the bulb portion of the plant — has been shown to inhibit the activity of macrophages, specialized white blood cells that play a key role in our body's immune defense system, and one of their defense activities involves the triggering of large-scale inflammatory responses. While macrophage activity is typically a good thing, inhibition of their activity can sometimes be critical in getting chronic unwanted inflammation under control.
Onion's antioxidants — including its hallmark flavonoid antioxidant, quercetin — also provide us with anti-inflammatory benefits. These antioxidants help prevent the oxidation of fatty acids in our body. When we have lower levels of oxidized fatty acids, our body produces fewer pro-inflammatory messaging molecules, and our level of inflammation is kept in check.
Cancer Protection
Onion has repeatedly been shown to lower our risk of several cancers, even when we consume it in only moderate amounts. "Moderate" generally means 1-2 times per week, even though in some studies it has been used to mean up to 5-6 times per week. Colorectal cancer, laryngeal cancer, and ovarian cancer are the cancer types for which risk is reduced along with moderate amounts of dietary onion. For other cancer types, however, moderate intake of onion has not been enough to show significant risk reduction. For these cancer types — including esophageal cancer and cancers of the mouth — daily intake of onion is required before research results show significant risk reduction.
Many factors may play a role in these different research findings for different cancer types. However, the overall take-away from this research seems clear: you do not want to err on the side of small onion servings or infrequent onion intake if you want to obtain the full cancer-related benefits of onion. A few slivers of sliced onion on a tossed salad are a good thing--but probably not enough to provide you with the cancer-related onion benefits that you are seeking. In recipes that already call for onion, try to include at least 1 whole onion (medium size) in the recipe. In recipes that do not already call for onion, consider the addition of 1 medium size onion (if you think onion might fit into the recipe and still provide a tasty outcome). In terms of individual portion sizes when you sit down to eat a meal, try to consume the equivalent of 1/2 onion.
Other Health Benefits
In animal studies, onions have shown potential for improvement of blood sugar balance, even though it is not yet clear about the carry over of these benefits for humans who are seeking better blood sugar balance from their diet. Most of the animal studies have been conducted on rats, and most have used onion juice or onion extract as the form of onion tested. Future research is needed to clarify onion's potential for helping lower blood sugar and improving blood sugar control, especially in persons with blood sugar problems.
While not as well researched as garlic in terms of antibacterial benefits, onion has nevertheless been shown to help prevent bacterial infection. Along with its sulfur-containing compounds, the flavonoid quercetin contained in onion helps provide these antibacterial benefits. We've seen studies showing antibacterial activity of onion in relationship to the bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. (These bacteria are commonly involved in the production of tooth cavities). Antibacterial benefits have also been shown in the area of gum (periodontal) disease bacteria, including Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia. Interestingly, in one study, fresh, chopped, uncooked onion had antibacterial effects on these potentially unwanted gum bacteria, but non-fresh, uncooked onion (raw onion that was chopped and then left to sit for 2 days at room temperature) did not demonstrate these same antibacterial properties nor did fresh onion that was grated and then steamed for 10 minutes. While it is not possible to draw broad conclusions from a single lab study, these findings suggest that length of storage (for onion that has been chopped but not cooked) and duration of heat exposure (in this case involving exposure to steam for 10 full minutes) can affect some of onion's health benefits. For these reasons, special care may be needed in the storage, handling, and cooking of this allium vegetable.

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